Monday, November 14, 2016

Building a Novel Aesthetic



I’ve always used playlists as a way to get into my manuscript drafts, but I recently discovered another way to help myself focus: art! I’m sure you’re all shocked, given the number of posts I’ve written about artists I’ve found on DeviantArt. Instead of telling you how to use art to craft a novel aesthetic image (which is really just a productive way to procrastinate), I’ll show you how I found the pictures for my work-in-progress novella.

First, my two main characters, Rona and Lief. Rona is a red-headed Scandinavian warrior who grew up traipsing the Seven Seas on her father’s ship. Since hair color can be tricky to match in aesthetic searches, I’m sticking with a blond version of Rona I found by Raph04.

Keyword trail: Viking pirate, pirate, Viking warrior, warrior woman, Viking warrior woman*

Lief is a merman cursed with magical charm biologically intended to woo bloodthirsty sirens. He has always been Chris Hemsworth in my head, because reasons. The most difficult part was finding a version of Chris that leaned towards the idea in my head instead of towards Thor or a red carpet appearance. After years of scrolling, I found this drawing by Angie-Farewell

Keyword trail: Hemsworth, Chris Hemsworth

Now to the setting. I like to pick a few images that evoke the settings or emotional motifs of the story. Since I’ve written the first draft, I know I need a ship, a dangerous ocean scene, and possibly a Greek-style temple on an oasis island.

I love this digital painting by elbardo—it shows the perfect mood of a scene when Rona and Lief think they’ve finally found a safe place to get out of the ocean. 

Keyword trail: ship, ship on ocean, Viking ship

For my second mood picture, I tracked down an underwater scene that goes almost perfectly with my final scenes. It's a digital painting by Marta Nael

Keyword trail: ocean, dark ocean, evil ocean, underwater

Google Images is often better for certain searches—and that’s how I discovered Charles Hermans’ gorgeous painting of Circe the Temptress. She’s the basis for my primary villain, and I love the look on this young woman’s face. 

Keyword trail: island, Circe, Circe island, Circe’s island

At this point, I need the rest of my villains—the onslaught of mythical monsters that Rona and Lief have to fight their way through.

One of the deadliest predators in the sea: an evil siren by M. Thompson

  

 
A Commander 2014 fan-art version of the kraken, by velinov:


And finally, an evil water horse someone pinned on Pinterest via a website that sadly hid the name of the original artist (if you can track them down please let me know!). This one was difficult to find, especially since I combined a couple of myths to create this piranha-shark-sea serpent-horse combination. 

Keyword trail: water horse, waterhorse, hippocampus, evil hippocampus


There you have it! If you have writing to do but just aren't feeling it, tell everyone you're working on a novel aesthetic! It's the perfect way to get your head back into gear. 

Happy hunting!







Michelle is terrified by the thought of a piranha-shark-sea serpent-horse and would like to apologize to herself and others for creating such a monster. 






*Juuuuuust a little rant here. BIKINIS ARE NOT ARMOR. STOP DRAWING WOMEN RUNNING AROUND IN THE SNOW WEARING THREE SQUARE INCHES OF CHAIN MAIL FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS HOLY.

1 comment:

  1. Great bunch of images. I haven’t tried creating an image library for a story, though my wife finds it useful in her writing.

    I love the hippocampus image. I think the image is from a hidden object game titled “Otherworld - Spring of the Shadows”.

    With the passing of our two cats in the past couple of months, we find ourselves bereft of fur babies. I wonder if could get the landlord’s permission for a hippocampus.

    I also love that a part of the brain is called the hippocampus. I now have the image of the creature swimming in my head, which might explain a few of my peculiarities.

    I'm with you on the bikini thing, both the furred and armored kind. Frank Frazetta, seems to be a major influence of that visual trope. I'm not sure if he was the first, but he certainly was prolific purveyor of such images.

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